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Rupert DUCK. Parents: Albert William DUCK and Edith (Morely) DUCK.


Wilfred DUCK. Parents: Albert William DUCK and Edith (Morely) DUCK.


DUCKS.31,140 1904 Henderson's Directory:
Ducks
Post Office is called Monte Creek (See Monte Creek)
Station on the mainline of the C.P.R. 268 miles east of Vancouver on the South Thompson River 18 miles east of Kamloops in Yale District; has a telegraph office and a Post Office called Monte Creek. Mails daily. Ranching is a principle industry in this section. Stage to Grande Prairie semi weekly
Post Master William Plumm

Monte Creek
(See Ducks Station, Shuswap)
In the Dominion electoral district of Yale and Caribou, and the provincial north riding of Yale. Situated on the mainline of the C.P.R. There is a money order office, telegraph and express office. Chief industry is stock raising. The climate is dry and healthy. Fishing and shooting cannot be beaten. Stage leaves here every Wednesday and Saturday for Grande Prairie, which is 20 miles south. Population 1904 - 180.
Post Master. William Plumm

A number of interviews of residents of Ducks were carried out during the investigations into the Ducks robbery of 8 May 1906. On the 18 May 1906, after the robbers had been captured, C.P.R. Special service detective William McLeod drove a rig out to Ducks to undertake interviews. He arrived in Ducks at 1:00 PM and started his interviews.
Robert Daniels, T.D. and Mrs. Miller, James Sinclair, George Brithell, William Dobson, Sam Davidson, C.P.R. Agent William Plumm and Mrs. Plumm, J. Shaw, John Ulivilla, L. Rawiluge (?), E. Hajla (?), E. Biscue (?), A. R. Kinnear and Mrs., P. Ross, Fred Warren, T. D. Wood, Mrs. Ward and mother were all talked to with no real results. An apparent discrepancy now appears, as Agent Plumm definitely knew Miner, yet McLeod's report does did not intimate that fact at this time.
George Hazelhurst and W. C. Adams, store keeper, could give McLeod additional information. McLeod was also told that "a man named King who lives at Grande Prairie could give more information regarding George Edwards."


In May 1906 Inspector A. W. DUFFUS56 was a R.N.W.M.P. officer in Calgary, AB. Calgary Inspector W.A. Dufus, commanding "E" Division in Calgary, wrote a detailed crime report on the incident near the Douglas Lake Cattle Company home ranch.


D. S. DUNDAS223 During and after the Mission robbery from Sep 1904 to May 1906 he was a hotel proprietor in Chilliwack, B.C. He rented a room to one of the Mission robbers soon after the Mission Junction robbery.

Chilliwak Progress, 14 Sept 1904.
D.S. Dundas was the owner of the Commercial Hotel in Chilliwak. Advertised as recently refitted and in good shape for a first class trade there are hot and cold baths and good outbuildings. Rates are $1 to $1.50 a day, and a pool table is on the premises.

During his May 23rd interview with Thiel detective #38, Mr. Dundas went on to relate that on the 13th of November, 1904, G. W. Edwards and Geo. W. Aldous came to the Commercial Hotel and stayed two or three days. They took some horses to Ladner's Landing and sold them; took eleven down and sold them, and left three riding horses in the barn. It is assumed that the horses were loaded on steamers for the trip to Ladner's Landing. He then gave a description of George Aldous to the operative.


Outlaw Billy "Shorty" DUNN was born on 15 Apr 1869 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.225,234,255 He played the role of Miner's willing robbery accomplice at Ducks. He was living in 1906 in Princeton, B.C. He was naturalized as a Canadian on 10 Jan 1927 in Ootsa Lake, B.C.256 He was also known as John William Grell.255,257 He was also known as the Milwaukee Dutchman.225,257 He was also known as Billy Dunn.225 He was also known as Thomas William Dunn. He died of drowning in the Ootsa River when it was in flood 27 June1927 near Ootsa Lake, B.C.258,259 Shorty Dunn's probate states clearly that Dunn drowned in the Tahtsa River and that he lived at Ootsa Lake, so this will be accepted as the facts of his place of demise. It is also probably fact that his body was found one year later at Tahtsa Forks.

From the Kamloops Sentinel, Friday July 29, 1927:
"Shorty" Dunn, Bill Miner's Pal, Loses Life in Ootsa Lake
Princeton
Recently A.J. White received a telegram from C.H. Hansen of Ootsa Lake, northern B.C., stating that J. W. Grill, (sic) better known locally as "Shorty" or Billy Dunn, had met his death by drowning.
"Shorty" gained world wide notoriety through his association with Bill Miner and Calhoun (sic) in the famous train hold up at Ducks over 20 years ago. He was awarded a life sentence when captured, not so much for the part he had taken during the hold up but owing to the fact that he opened fire on the police when they attempted to capture the bandits."
"After serving a long period he was paroled, and later took up his residence here (Princeton), assuming for a time the management of Mr. White's store. Prior to his leaving here in the summer of 1921, he gave all the children of Princeton a picnic at a grove on the Aldous ranch, of which those taking part will always carry glad recollection. Whatever his faults may have been, anything but kindly recollection of him is held by people here."
"It was through the untiring efforts of Mts. Allison, Sr., that Mr. Grill's (sic) reprieve was finally accrued. At the time of his death he was understood to have been conducting a store at Ootsa Lake for Mr. Hansen, which necessitated the operation of a boat in bringing in supplies. The wire asked for possible information regarding relatives, but Mr. White could not supply any."

In the B.C. Archives copy (NW905 S559) of the Apr-Sep 1946 Shoulder Strap, Vol.3, 15th Edition, is an article on Shorty Dunn that is somewhat fictionalized, but does give some good information about Dunn's time in the Ootsa Lake country and his application for citizenship. Again, Const. Fairbairn plays a role in the story. After Grell had told him about his former prison status, Fairbairn took Grell's case to Judge F. McB. Young of Prince Rupert. Due to the fact that Grell had put in so many years of exemplary behaviour and achieved an unblemished record in the Ootsa Lake country, that he should be given a chance to obtain Canadian citizenship. In describing Grell's death, it mentions that he "was in the company of a forestry prospector on a trip down from Whitesail to Ootsa in a canoe. The waters were in flood and in the swift treacherous current the canoe was upset."
Grell (Shorty Dunn) was drowned, but the forestry prospector managed to swim to a nearby water-covered island and pulled himself into a tree out of the flowing water. The survivor eventually managed to hail passing boats and was rescued, but Grell's body didn't show up until 12 months later.
"Grell's body was found by a party of wandering Indians, floating face down among the willows in a quiet backwater near Tatsa River Forks."
The body was reported to B.C. Provincial Police Const. G.A. Johnson at Burns Lake, and a few days later a police party identified the remains. Const. Johnson presided over a brief ceremony in a grove of trees on the bank of the river, and committed the body of John William Grell to his grave.

Letters of Probate for William Grell.

Billy Dunn's date and place of death is verified in his letters of probate. He died of drowning in the Tahtsa River 27 June 1927. He left an estate worth $82.90, and a Waltham watch. An "Edward van Tine of Ootsa Lake in Br. Col. swears and makes oath that he knew and was well acquainted with John William Grell in his lifetime." John Grell died on or about the 27 June 1927 and van Tine saw and recognized his dead body by the Waltham watch that was found on the body. Sworn in Smithers 17 May 1929.
He was buried Spring 1928 in Tatla Forks on the bank of the Ootsa River.

Additional information and sources pertinent to this individual are available in the password protected section of this website. The password is located at the rear of the book, "Interred With Their Bones. Bill Miner in Canada. 1903 to 1907," by Peter Grauer.


Lizzie DUPUIS260 saw Colquhoun chasing a horse behind the Barnes' place. She provided a statement to C.P.R. Detective McLeod.

Deputy Attorney General McLean's 22 May 1906 letter to Mcintyre states that "Miss Lizzie Dupuis of Campbell Creek Post Office who lives with Mrs. Barnes will state that on the 4th May last etc."

Lizzie lived at the George Barnes place and saw Colquhoun on the Friday before the robbery. Balf mentions a Luis Dupuis who started a ranch in the Campbell Creek area around 1905.

Lizzie Dupuis, on 4 May 1906, was out south of her place (Barnes') about a mile from the house looking for a horse. A man came out of the bush on horse back. He was apparently also trying to catch a horse which had got loose on him. He rode over to her and asked whether we had a corral, and she replied that she had not and rode away from him. When interviewed by C.P.R. Detective McLeod on 19 May 1906, and presented with photos of the robbers, she positively identified the individual she had seen as Colquhoun. She also described the horse Colquhoun was riding as a bay with no white, and the loose one as a bay with white face and possibly white feet. It was also larger than the one Colquhoun was riding. She told McLeod she was coming into town Monday and will see the prisoners and the horses if possible.
When she came to town, McLeod's report stated that she readily identified the horses captured during the pursuit of the robbers. The smaller one was ridden by Colquhoun, and the larger one was the one he was chasing. It was one of the hobbled ones and had a white face. She also was confronted with Colquhoun at the Kamloops Goal, and identified him as the man she had seen.


In 1904 Superintendent James E. DYE27,130,149,261,262 was a detective in charge of the Pinkerton’s office in Seattle, WA, USA. He assisted the B.C. Provincial Police in the investigation of the Mission Junction robbery.

"Call in Pinkerton's"
Described as an "Assistant Superintendent" for Pinkerton's out of Seattle, Dye's descendants assisted book author Williams with information and scrapbooks.
After the Mission robbery, Dye felt sure that the leader of the bandits was Miner.

F.W. Anderson, p9
The B.C. Provincial Police solicited the help of the Pinkerton Detective Agency, who had 35 years experience tracking down train and bank robbers. James E. Dye, the Pinkerton Superintendent in Seattle sent immediate assistance. A total reward of $11,500 was posted by the railroad, B.C. government, and the U.S. government.
Dye was sure Bill Miner was behind the Mission robbery. He was still investigating the Oregon Rail Road and Navigation Co.'s 23 Sep 1903 robbery. Miner was the only one he knew that was so polite while robbing a train. The smaller robber had warned the engineer to be careful while backing the train. This, plus descriptions of the robber, convinced him it was Miner.

Vancouver Daily Province, 12 Sep 1904
Dye was in Vancouver by Monday the 12th, and five of his investigators were expected to arrive by that evening to assist in the Mission robbery investigation. Both the B.C. Provincial Police and the C.P.R. occasionally made use of private detective agencies to assist them in their investigations.

On the night of the 12th, Dye had a lengthy consultation with Gen. Sup't Marpole of the C.P.R. That evening five Pinkerton detectives from the Seattle office joined the Vancouver police and the B.C. Provincial Police. (NWC 13 Sep 04)

Okanagan Historical Society (OHS)  #48
Dye is quoted as saying that Miner couldn't keep out of jail, and he couldn't stay in one either. Miner had five jail breaks on his record all together.


On 15 Sep 1904 Hamilton EDGE263 was a farmer in Port Haney, B.C. Some sources say Edge lived across the Fraser River from Port Haney, in the general area of Langley.

In the New Westminster Columbian of 15 Sep 1904, he relates how he ferried a man across the river to Port Haney from his place on the Monday following the Mission robbery on Saturday the 10th. He was unaware of the robbery just a few days previous, and during the morning of the 12th. Edge ferried him across, and the individual immediately headed off in the direction of Lillooet. Edge subsequently learned, after reading the description of the bandit leader, that the man he ferried "tallied in every detail with the Penitentiary picture of the leader."

It is unlikely this story is correct, as Miner was definitely in Chilliwack at this time.


Jack EDMONDS264 was living between 1904 and 1906 in Hedley, B.C. He providing boarding services to Miner as Edwards. He also provided anecdotes about Miner's life in Hedley.

From Cawston. V.B., Periodical, "The Quick Grey Fox ... Fact vs Fiction" (Bank of British Columbia's Pioneer News, Feb/Mar 1984)
Jack Edmonds and his wife Eliza (nee Bromley) had Miner (as Edwards) as a boarder in Hedley between 1904 and 1906. The Edmonds were friends of the Cawston family, and Verna Cawston heard first hand many of their memories of the Miner story. "They had been quite impressed with this Southern gentleman - how he taught Sunday school sometimes and on one occasion he preached the sermon when the Presbyterian minister was absent. This talent popped up more than once and not only in Hedley."
"Edwards was friendly and charming and took a great interest in the growth of the village, especially the new Nickel Plate mine, with it's unique power flumes, tramways and noisy mill. He was amazed that gold bricks were being shipped to the coast in ordinary sacks tossed in with similar sacks of ordinary commodities. Mr. Edwards also let it be known that his shares in a Mexican silver mine were paying off very well. It was natural that he should be interested in a gold mine - it too, was so very remunerative."
"He made friends easily and was very popular at the local dances, where he often spelled off the fiddler.


Samuel ELLIOTT43,75,265

In 1906 he was a conductor with the C.P.R. in Kamloops, B.C. He allayed the fears of the passengers during and after the Ducks robbery. In the Vancouver Province of 9 May 1906, it is made clear that the conductor on the train robbed at Ducks was Samuel Elliott of Kamloops.

1898 B.C. Voter's List:
Elliott, Samuel Edward, Kamloops, Church St, S. side, Conductor

1915 Kamloops Directory:
There was a Samuel E. Elliott (Sara) in Kamloops at 343 St Paul Street, and he also was a conductor for the C.P.R.


Trainmaster W. ELSON266 Trainmaster W. Elson, from Revelstoke, was in Kamloops after the Ducks robbery, in charge of the C.P.R. sub-division.

In the Vancouver Daily Province of 10 May 1906, it states that Trainmaster Elson of Revelstoke reached Kamloops that morning from the scene of the robbery. He came into town on a light engine which was at the disposal of the trackers and various posses. He came picked up supplies for the men out on the trail of the robbers.

Inland Sentinel, Tues. 21 June 1904.
The Kamloops paper mentions that "Trainmaster Elson of Revelstoke was in town yesterday." This insert in the paper confirms the spelling of his last name.

A search on Elson has not revealed much about this individual.


ENDERBY. From the 1905 Henderson's Gazetteer and Directory for B.C.
Enderby
(See also Mara, Hullcar and Glen Emma.)
An incorporated town on the Okanagan branch of the C.P.R., distance from Sicamous 24 miles. Has telegraph office, money order and post office. Steamers also run between Enderby and Sicamous distance 25 miles. It is the head of navigation and the outlet of the Spallumcheen Valley and is the gateway town of the Okanagan Valley. There are 80 miles of water communication to Penticton at foot of Okanagan Lake. A 200 bbl roller processed flour mill here. Farming and stock raising are the industries. 50 acres have been laid out for a town site. The town has Presbyterian, Methodist and Anglican churches and public school.
Chief of Police - Basil Gardom.


ENDERBY PROGRESS. The Enderby Progress provided some interesting snippets of information on Basil Gardom, the Enderby based B.C. Provincial Police constable involved in the Ducks robbery investigation, and also some local coverage of the Ducks robbery aftermath. The original copies are available in the Enderby Museum and Archives.
See the following website for more information-
http://www.enderbymuseum.ca/thepast/comser/news/common.htm

 


Violet EVANS died in 1935. Violet Evans was John Garcia's second wife. Their children were Harold, Leslie, George, Mary, Phyllis and Violet.

Spouse: John GARCIA. John GARCIA and Violet EVANS were married in 1925.


Maximilian Etxune EWART. 1905 First permanent Constable, Maximilian Etxune Ewart. Keremeos. (WWW)

B.C. Archives
GR0055
Vol. 80
B.C. Provincial Police
Lists of names taken from public accounts 1889 to 1929
Public accounts, 1 July 1905- 30 June 1906
Page b39
Const. N.W. Ewart, Keremeos - 2 mos. $65/mo = $130

There was some initial confusion between Const. M.E. Ewart in Keremeos and Const. R. Hewat in Princeton, but we now find that they were both new hires in 1906 in their respective communities.


Corporal Andrew FAIRBAIRN.267,268 Corporal A. Fairbairn was a B.C. Provincial Police Constable stationed in the area around Burns Lake. He knew Shorty Dunn as William Grell in the Ootsa Lake country, and assisted him in gaining his Canadian citizenship.

Colin Rickards in the Real West magazine of Oct 1970, elaborates on the naturalization story. Dunn mentioned to RCMP (B.C. Provincial Police?) Corporal Andy Fairburn, (A. Fairbairn, Reg #33, member of the B.C. Provincial Police for many years.) the resident officer at Telkwa, that he would like to go in to Smithers to apply for Canadian citizenship. Dunn admitted to the officer, who knew him as William Grell, of his involvement in the Ducks robbery. Corporal Fairburn took Dunn's case to Judge F. Young at Prince Rupert, and there the citizenship papers were granted to Dunn.
Rickards goes on to describe Dunn's demise. Shorty was on a trip with a prospector from Whitesail to Ootsa. Their canoe overturned in some rapids, and while the prospector made it to shore, Dunn drowned. After his body was found over a year later by wandering Indians, (RCMP?) Constable G. A. Johnson went out to Tatsa River Forks, identified the body, and Dunn was buried on the river bank.

In the B.C. Archives copy (NW905 S559) of the Apr-Sep 1946 Shoulder Strap, Vol.3, 15th Edition, is an article on Shorty Dunn that is somewhat fictionalized, but does give some good information about Dunn's time in the Ootsa Lake country and his application for citizenship. Again, Const. Fairbairn plays a role in the story. After Grell had told him about his former prison status, Fairbairn took Grell's case to Judge F. McB. Young of Prince Rupert. Due to the fact that Grell had put in so many years of exemplary behaviour and achieved an unblemished record in the Ootsa Lake country, that he should be given a chance to obtain Canadian citizenship. In describing Grell's death, it mentions that he "was in the company of a forestry prospector on a trip down from Whitesail to Ootsa in a canoe. The waters were in flood and in the swift treacherous current the canoe was upset."
Grell (Shorty Dunn) was drowned, but the forestry prospector managed to swim to a nearby water-covered island and pulled himself into a tree out of the flowing water. The survivor eventually managed to hail passing boats and was rescued, but Grell's body didn't show up until 12 months later.
"Grell's body was found by a party of wandering Indians, floating face down among the willows in a quiet backwater near Tatsa River Forks."
The body was reported to B.C. Provincial Police Const. G.A. Johnson at Burns Lake, and a few days later a police party identified the remains. Const. Johnson presided over a brief ceremony in a grove of trees on the bank of the river, and committed the body of John William Grell to his grave.

Fairburn almost assuredly was a B.C. Provincial Police member.


FALKLAND. From the 1905 Henderson's Gazetteer and Directory for B.C.
A post settlement in North Yale 10 miles east of Grande Prairie. Nearest railway station Armstrong distance 18 miles.
Postmaster - William Bell.

Falkland saw B.C. Provincial Police Constable Gardom interviewing a number of its citizens during investigations after the Ducks robbery. Gardom talks of locations between the bridge north of Falkland and also the bridge, now known as Schwebs Bridge, south of Falkland as well as Glen Emma.


Constable William Lewis FERNIE1,18,43,138,146,269,270,271,272 was born on 2 Apr 1869 in Maccelesfield, Cheshire, England.273 He was educated at Owens College (medical side) Victoria University before 1888 in Manchester, England.269 Fernie started his education in Macclesfield, Cheshire at King Edward IV Grammar School. He immigrated in May 1888 to Minnedosa, Manitoba. He was Church of England in 1901 in Kamloops, B.C. In 1906 he was a policeman in Kamloops, B.C.270,274 By 1910, Fernie is noted as being the chief provincial constable. In 1906 Fernie was living on 4th Avenue. He died on 23 Jul 1943 in Kamloops, B.C.

Additional information and sources pertinent to this individual are available in the password protected section of this website. The password is located at the rear of the book, "Interred With Their Bones. Bill Miner in Canada. 1903 to 1907," by Peter Grauer.
Spouse: Mary Isabel LYLE. Constable William Lewis FERNIE and Mary Isabel LYLE were married on 11 Sep 1905 in Kamloops, B.C.265


FIREARMS.275 Information and sources pertinent to this subject are only available in the password protected section of this website. The password is located at the rear of the book, "Interred With Their Bones. Bill Miner in Canada. 1903 to 1907," by Peter Grauer.


FISH LAKE RANCH276 was where Goodwin rustled Douglas Lake Cattle Co. mares, supposedly with Jack Budd as an accomplice. Goodwin was the owner of the Fish Lake ranch located adjacent to the Douglas Lake ranch. The ranch's name was eventually changed to the Norfolk ranch, and was eventually acquired by the Douglas Lake Cattle Co..
Campbell Carroll in "Three Bar. The Story of Douglas Lake" states that in 1905-1906, Goodwin was charged by J. B. Greaves of the Douglas Lake Ranch with horse stealing. Carroll also notes that Jack Budd was an accomplice of Goodwin's, and that charges were laid against him also. Despite the testimony of a young cowboy employed by Goodwin named Oliver Walker, who testified that he and Goodwin had rounded up 28 of the Douglas Lake Company's purebred mares, the charges were dismissed. Walker also testified that 11 of the Douglas Lake horses had their brands treated to an application of a blistering agent such as lump jaw or spavin cure. This caused the hide to raise and the Douglas Lake brand to come off in three or four days. Walker testified Goodwin said that he intended to ship the animals once they were back in good shape.


Edward FISHER In 1906 he was a clerk in Kamloops, B.C.1,274,277 The 1905 and 1910 B.C. Directories note him as being clerk in a government office. He was living on Main Street in 1906. Edward Fisher, described as a clerk, was at the Kamloops bridge incident with Pearse and Kilpatrick after the Ducks robbery.


Lou FOX18,278 was born on 5 Apr 1887 in Ontario. He was Church of England in 1901 in Kamloops, B.C. He was living in 1906 in the Duck Range east of Kamloops.139 He was one of the drunken cowboys rustling cows from the Kamloops City Pound. He was involved in the engineered escape of Lewis Campbell senior's cattle from the City of Kamloops pound on the night of the Ducks robbery.

Balf notes a Fred Fox settling in the Campbell Range around 1893.

In the 1901 Census, there are two Fox families in the Campbell Creek, Ducks area. There is William Fox and his wife Mary, 32 and 27, and there is Louis Fox (19), with no wife, but with daughters Mabel (4) and Maude (2). Both daughters were born in B.C. As they appear consecutively in the Census, they most likely lived with or next to each other. No other Louis Fox appears in the area, so this is probably the cowboy that worked for the Campbell Ranch.

It appears as though the two Fox males are brothers, as they were both born in Ontario, and live in close proximity to each other. William and his wife are not old enough to be Louis' parents.


Isabella FRISKEN was born in 1864 in Scotland.24 She was of the Presbyterian faith in 1891 in Kamloops, B.C. She died in 1899 in Kamloops, B.C.

Spouse: John MCLEOD. John MCLEOD and Isabella FRISKEN were married before 1890 in Kamloops, B.C. Children were: Angus D. MCLEOD.


Margaret FRISKEN was born about 1868 in Scotland.24 She was of the Presbyterian faith in 1891 in Kamloops, B.C. She was the mother of William F. McLeod.

Spouse: William W. MCLEOD. William W. MCLEOD and Margaret FRISKEN were married before 1884 in Kamloops, B.C. Children were: Evander MCLEOD, William Frisken MCLEOD, Angus MCLEOD, Norman MCLEOD.


Alec FULTON. Parents: Attorney General Frederick John FULTON and Winifred M DAVIE.


Edmond Davie FULTON.279 Davie Fulton, the son of Kamloops lawyer Frederick Fulton, became a Rhodes Scholar in 1937.
In 1945, as a Conservative and brought home from the war by the party, he was elected by a plurality of merely 100 votes.

See (http://www.knowbc.com/IEB.C./IEB.C.asp)

Parents: Attorney General Frederick John FULTON and Winifred M DAVIE.


Frederick FULTON. Parents: Attorney General Frederick John FULTON and Winifred M DAVIE.


Attorney General Frederick John FULTON280,281,282,283,284,285 was born on 8 Dec 1862 in Bedlington, Northumberland, England.286,287 In 1906 he was a lawyer in Kamloops, B.C.1,274,277 In 1906 directories, Fulton was noted as a Barrister-at-Law. In the 1905 B.C. Directory the entry reads "Hon Provincial Secretary, Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public, Solicitor (for the) Canadian Bank of Commerce". The 1910 Directory merely states "Fulton, Frederick J, (KC) Barrister and Solicitor, Victoria St." He died on 25 Jul 1936 in Kamloops, B.C. He was the crown prosecutor at the robber's trial.

See http://www.fultonco.com/history/history.htm for a corporate description of the life and accomplishments of Frederick Fulton.

Norm Fetterly, in his unpublished manuscript, writes:
"Fulton entered (provincial) politics in 1900 defeating the Liberal incumbent Francis Deane. He continued in politics until 1909 when he resigned on a question of principal in opposing a secret deal involving the railroad."
"Fulton was a prominent and respected lawyer and citizen of Kamloops."

Kamloops Inland Sentinel, 30 Sept 1904, p2
"City and Country" column. In this column it notes that Fulton will be acting for the Crown at the cases to be held at the Fall Assizes in Kamloops. They are to be held the following week, and will include the Smoky Chisholm shooting trial of Brooks, which Bill Miner will be attending as an observer. Alex Mcintyre will be the defence lawyer, and will have some surprises in store for Fulton.

GR1323
B.C. AG Correspondence, Letters Inward, 1902 to 1937
Microfilm Reel B2051
18 Oct 1904, Victoria
At that assizes Alec Mcintyre acted as defense counsel for Brooks, and was successful against Fulton in getting the case against Brooks dismissed.
By May of 1906 Fulton was the Attorney General of B.C. At the Grand Jury hearing (preliminary hearing) Fulton acted as prosecutor against the three train robbers, while Alec Mcintyre acted as defense counsel. During the trial itself, Fulton left the prosecution to his Deputy Attorney General McLean.

Vancouver World, 19 May 06, p1
Attorney General Fulton led the prosecution team during the Grand Jury preliminary hearing, presided over by Justice of the Peace and Kamloops Mayor Marshall Gordon. The trial prosecution was then led by the Deputy Attorney General, McLean.

On 6 July 1906, Fulton received a letter from Postal Inspector Greenfield with regards to Miner's money that was being held by the Warden of the B.C. Pen. In this letter, Greenfield inquires of Fulton whether the monies found in Edward's (Miner's) possession after the robbery might be used to compensate the persons who sustained losses during the Ducks robbery. He quotes a letter he received from the Warden of the B.C. Pen June 11th that notes that Miner wishes to use his money now in the Warden's possession. The Warden had described the banknotes found with Miner.

Carving the Western Path," Harvey.
In 1909 Fulton resigned from McBride's government over a point of principle. He had been lobbying hard for a new road to the Coast to replace the one destroyed by the C.P.R. during construction through the Canyon. The new automobiles that were increasingly appearing from the east into B.C. had to be loaded onto the C.P.R. at Kamloops and transported by rail for the trip to the Coast as no suitable road bed was available. When Fulton heard that Premier McBride had granted provincial funding to speculators for a second railway through the canyon making road building that much more difficult, he handed in his resignation. He was a good friend of McBride's and an excellent legislator. In turn, he ran for federal office, and was elected to Ottawa, founding a political dynasty.

Mary Balf, in Norm Fetterly's files on E Davie Fulton, writes that father Frederick ran as an "Independent Conservative" in the 1900 election. In 1902 he won again by only 25 votes against Deane. He was promoted to the cabinet position of AG and Chief Commissioner of Lands in 1905, and these positions were renewed after the election of 1907.
He became QC (Queen's Council) in 1902. He resigned from the government of Sir Richard McBride in 1909, due to objections to the Premier's railway policy.
He was appointed to the wartime coalition government in Ottawa as a Conservative Unionist, and when the coalition ended in 1920, he retired from politics.

In 1911, Fulton and Judge Swanson, along with the Rev. Akehurst, were charged by Council to decide on a coat of arms. They invited designs and it was awarded to W Miller-Higgs of Savona.

Spouse: Winifred M DAVIE. Attorney General Frederick John FULTON and Winifred M DAVIE were married in 1909 in Kamloops, B.C.195 Frederick and Winifred had 4 sons, E Davie was the youngest.
Fetterly writes:
The two older brothers, Alec and Jack, were mechanically inclined. The two youngest, Fred and Davie, loved horses.
They (the Fultons) owned a pasture behind St Ann's Academy. Children were: John "Moose" FULTON, Alec FULTON, Frederick FULTON, Edmond Davie FULTON.


John "Moose" FULTON.288 John Fulton distinguished himself in the RCAF during WWII. He went missing in action in late 1942, and in 1943 Kamloops adopted the "Moose Squadron" in honour of it's commander. In 1944 the Kamloops airport was dedicated as Fulton Field. Parents: Attorney General Frederick John FULTON and Winifred M DAVIE.


Delores GARCIA31,43,74,125 was born in 1910 in Aspen Grove, B.C. On 27 Feb 2002 the writer and his wife visited Delores and her grandson Scott McLeod, at the McLeod Ranch 1 km N of the Aspen Grove turn off of the Okanagan Connector. These McLeod's have a connection with the Knutsford McLeod's and the Campbell Range and Westwold McLeods. Delores's husband Norman McLeod was Scott's grandfather.

Notes from Delores Garcia interview:
Johnny Garcia was Delores's father, Frank Garcia was his brother. Frank appears at age 30 (b 3 Aug 1870) in the 1901 Census, born in B.C. and of the "Mexican" race.
Delores was born in the cabin still standing at the front of the ranch property. The writer obtained photographs of this structure. Apparently Miner had visited her mother and father a few times. She described him as a "nice man" and that he had buried some of his treasure "up in the Tulameen country." Delores must have heard these stories from her parents.
Delores had a brother Johnny, (Tona she called him, as a nickname.) She had at least one sister, Edna. They were both older than her. Delores's mother died when she was still a baby, and she doesn't remember her. Her father married again to Violet Evans, and they had 6 more children. Her older brother and sister didn't like Violet very much, but Delores thought she was alright. When talking to Delores about Miner, she talked about the .22 cal rifle story associated with the McKays and McLeods in the Knutsford area. Her husband's mother liked Miner.
Delores said her mother's name (2nd wife) was Violet. She said that her Dad had married again and had 3 more children.

On the 1898 B.C. Voter's List we find the following Garcia's in the Similkameen and Nicola Valley areas:
Garcia, Francis J., Forks of Nicola, Farmer, YW
Garcia, Frank, Nicola, Courtney Lake, Farmer, YN
Garcia, Jesus, Nicola, Farmer, YW

1904 Henderson's B.C. Directory
Aspen Grove and Coutlee
Garcia, Frank. Rancher
Also in Coutlee we find Jesus and John Garcia as farmers.

1905 Henderson's B.C. Directory
Garcia, Frank. Rancher
Parents: John GARCIA and Lillian GUIDEREZ SHUTTLEWORTH.

Spouse: Norman MCLEOD. Norman MCLEOD and Delores GARCIA were married in 1928.


Edna GARCIA died in 1948 in Nazko, B.C. Parents: John GARCIA and Lillian GUIDEREZ SHUTTLEWORTH.


Jesus GARCIA was born in 1832. He died in 1916. Jesus Garcia and Mary Kroventko moved to the Nicola Valley in 1871. Altogether they had 14 children. Five were alive in 1916. Those alive were Jesus Jr. (1863-1908), Mary, Eleanor, Sara, Frank (born in Spuzzum), and Johnny, Delores's father. Frank first married Celina Lentinic (from Shulus) and they had Alphonse, Andrew, Agnes, Nellie and Allan. Frank's second wife was Cecile Spahan (from Coldwater) and they had Jesus, Joe, Charlie and Maurice.

Spouse: Mary KROVENTKO. Children were: John GARCIA.


John GARCIA289 was born in 1877. He died in 1950. Parents: Jesus GARCIA and Mary KROVENTKO.

Spouse: Lillian GUIDEREZ SHUTTLEWORTH. John GARCIA and Lillian GUIDEREZ SHUTTLEWORTH were married on 24 Apr 1899. Children were: John (Tona) GARCIA, Edna GARCIA, Delores GARCIA.

Spouse: Violet EVANS. John GARCIA and Violet EVANS were married in 1925.


John (Tona) GARCIA. John married his cousin Katy King. Parents: John GARCIA and Lillian GUIDEREZ SHUTTLEWORTH.


In May 1906 B.C. Provincial Police Constable Basil GARDOM290,291,292,293,294,295,296 was a police officer in living in Enderby, B.C. He investigated the area between the two bridges east and west of Falkland, and into Grande Prairie. He was a constable with the B.C. Provincial Police in Enderby, B.C.

 

Additional information and sources pertinent to this individual are only available in the password protected section of this website. The password is located at the rear of the book, "Interred With Their Bones. Bill Miner in Canada. 1903 to 1907," by Peter Grauer.


During the 1900 to 1920s William S. (Bill) GARRISON26,297,298 ran a freight business, and Miner would frequently ride on his wagon beside him. Garrison was a successful businessman in the Princeton area and frequently travelled with George Edwards as company. The fact that Edwards was trying to determine how the Nickel Plate Mine at Hedley was shipping it's gold out may be a reason for his attention. Other sources also mention this. Some of the sources give conflicting dates for when Garrison started his business in Princeton, and when he arrived.

Princeton. 100 Years. 1867 to 1967. Currie, 7.
Garrison was in the freighting business in Princeton from the early days on. He built his livery barn in 1890 and it shows up in many of the early photos of the town. He owned a ranch at Nine Mile and as well as being a freighter and rancher he took an active interest in horse racing in Princeton and was instrumental in getting the race track built in 1912.

The Dewdney Trail, Anderson, 21.
Apparently Garrison had originally been in Granite Creek, but when the claims ran out there by 1899, he and others moved to Princeton. Garrison developed the first freight and stage coach business in Princeton.

Clifford Schisler of Orillia ON wrote to PRG
"Bill Miner while on his trips to Hedley B.C. probably was there to case the chance of robbery of gold bullion that (Nickel Plate mine site) came from the quite good size gold mine.
There was an active beer parlour there and lots of miners.
Mr Garrison of Princeton had I believe the largest freight business in the town. He hauled a lot of freight to all 4 corners of that part of B.C.
It was common for Bill Miner to tie his saddle horse at the back of Garrison's freight wagon and ride on the seat next to the wagon driver going to Hedley etc."

In the Princeton book, (p 348) Ernie Garrison, son of W. S., states that in 1906, W. S. transported Bill Miner in a horse drawn cart from Midway, B.C. to Schisler's ranch on Bald Mountain, just east of Princeton. The road between Hedley and Princeton had not been completed for wagons, so the two of them rode by horse back from Hedley to the Schisler's ranch. Miner and Garrison spent the night at Schisler's, and then in the morning Garrison took the two horses back to Hedley, picked up his buggy and made his way back to Midway. Son Ernie mentions that he was born in Midway 27 Sep 1905. The Garrison family then moved to Princeton in 1907 to take advantage of the hauling work for the rail road construction.
W. S. Garrison was partners with Alec Broomfield in the livery and hotel business. They cut cards to see who would run what, and Broomfield got the hotel.
Garrison hauled ties and rails for the Great Northern, freight to the Nickel Plate, and hauled logs to mills for cutting into timber. After selling many of his draft horses to the Canadian Army in 1914-1915, Garrison bought his first solid tired one ton Ford truck in Penticton.

Garrison's anecdote is the first documented mention found by the writer of Miner being in the Midway country, but it ties in with the story that he first met the McKays and Tiltons of the Spallumcheen and Kamloops (Rosehill) in the Phoenix area. Then the statement given by George Edwards (Miner) when he was in the B.C. Pen indicates he had been in Phoenix, B.C. at least twice.

Currie, Laurie, Princeton. 100 Years. 1867 to 1967 (Princeton, B.C.: Similkameen Spotlight, 1967)
Garrison, in 1912, was one of the driving forces behind building a race track in Princeton. There is no doubt but that Jack Budd was one of the breeders of fine horses that raced on this track at Princeton.


Fred GERISSIANA (GUISIANO)118,220 was living in May 1906 in Kamloops, B.C. He was a witness to the pre-robbery events.  Kamloops papers mention that Fred saw the robbers camping at Robbins Range the night before the robbery. The ground was well searched by the locals after the robbery for buried treasure.

In Mary Balf's "Kamloops. A History to 1914", Fred Guisiano is noted as being the son-in-law of Constanz Disdero. Disdero had settled in the upper Monte Creek Valley in 1890. His son-in-law Fred joined him up in the Robbins Range area. Balf's spelling of Fred's last name is probably correct.


Amos GIBBARD209,299,300 was born about 1894. He remembered seeing Miner and his pals in Mission City, B.C. Amos Gibbard had met Miner as a young boy of 11 in 1904 in the Mission area.

Gibbard, David, Mission Municipality, Farmer, WDew
Gibbard, George, Mission, Farmer, WDew
Gibbard, Jabez, 19 Third St, Work Estate, Mill-hand, VicC
Gibbard, John Henry, Mission Municipality, N.W. 1/4 See 28, Tp 17, Farmer, WDew

The Gibbard property (NW Cnr, Sec 28) at Mission was directly north of the Mission Townsite, and just west and adjacent to the Solloway property. (Map, "Municipality of Mission," circa 1900.)

The Vancouver Province of 12 Sept 1966, p10, gives a short article on Bill Miner and how Amos Gibbard, a young boy of 11 in the Mission area in 1904, remembers the train robber. The article is written by Malcolm Turnbull, the B.C. Editor of the province.
Gibbard, at that time 73 years old, reported, "Miner and his two pals lived in Mission for almost a month before the robbery. I saw a lot of them since they lived in a tent right near us, almost where Harmon's Sawmill stands today."
"I remember they told my Dad they were looking for a place top set up a nursery and I guess most folks believed them."
"They paid cash for everything and bought butter, milk and other food from the Solloway (?) boys. They had their tent pitched on their farm, you know."
Gibbard told the reporter that the three men wandered extensively around the Mission district and got to know the trails and the lay of the land throughout the whole area, "better than anyone in Mission."
"They went by our place many a time. They were gentlemen and were kind. They weren't unclean and dirty and I guess by acting politely they didn't raise any suspicion."
"Imagine, they were so polite they even said goodnight to the engineer and told him to back up carefully so as not to run into anything."
Speaking of the manhunt for the robbers after the Mission robbery, Gibbard said, "But they outfoxed them all. Like I said, they knew the country better'n almost everyone here. The old folks figured they got away in a boat somehow."

Jean Webber, Editor, 48th Annual Report of the Okanagan Historical Society. "The Grey Fox Goes to Earth - Again!", by Verna B. Cawston (Wayside Press, Vernon B.C. 1984): p71
Cawston obviously had access to the Vancouver Province story as she quotes it in her OHS article.
Amos Gibbard of Mission was interviewed by the Vancouver Province in Sep 1966. Gibbard related that two strangers (one Miner) tented near his property in July of 1904. They spent their time getting to know every inch of the town. Gibbard recognized Miner two years later, after the Ducks robbery.
(Reading a copy of the Province article there is no reference to Gibbard recognizing Miner two years later, but Cawston's inference is most likely correct, taking into consideration the circulation of Mary Spencer's photos of the Ducks robbers which appeared in the Vancouver Province in May 1906. Also Gibbard refers to three men camping on the property, including Bill Miner.)


GLEN EMMA. Glen Emma was the post office from which James Christie wrote Sup't Hussey for an explanation for his arrest in May 1906. Christie was arrested by Constable Basil Gardom under suspicion of robbing the train at Ducks, and incarcerated in Vernon. Christie was arrested close to Glen Emma, so was probably living somewhere in the area when he had his fateful meeting with Gardom. However, he does not appear in the Glen Emma directory for 1905.

From the 1905 Henderson's Gazetteer and Directory for B.C.
Glen Emma (See also Enderby)
A post settlement in the Salmon River Valley and 4 miles from Salmon River bridge, halfway between Enderby and Grande Prairie, Salmon Arm distance 15 miles, Armstrong distance 17 miles.
Postmaster G. Mitchell
Bell, John. Farmer.
Bell, William. Farmer.
Bird, Donald. Farmer.
Bird, John. Farmer
Bird, Joseph Trigg. Farmer.
Bird, Leslie. Farmer.
Bird, Malcolm. Farmer
Drew, Henry Ferguson Alexander. Farmer.
French, Gordon. Farmer.
Gillis, Ewan T. Schoolteacher
Gilsaul, Joseph. Farmer.
Hadley, L.A. Farmer.
Hamer, Frederick. Farmer.
Hatfield, R. Farmer.
Kaiser, Lewis.
Kelly, Mrs Mary. Farmer.
Kelly, William. Farmer.
Kneller, Jabez. Farmer.
McAughtney, T. farmer.
McKnzie, J.C. farmer.
McLeod, Henry. Farmer.
Mitchell, George. Farmer and Postmaster.
Morgan, Edward.
Morgan, Hubert.
Schweb, Charles. Farmer.
Smith, Thomas. Farmer.
Vollrath, Charles. Farmer.
Wilson, George T. Farmer.


Alfred R. G. GOODWIN276,301,302,303 was living in the Douglas Lake area. He was part of the Ducks robbery investigation. He was charged, along with Jack Budd, with stealing horses from the Douglas Lake Ranch. He accompanied Hazelhurst when they saw the calf shot by the robbers. Goodwin was the owner of the Fish Lake ranch, located adjacent to the Douglas Lake ranch. The ranch's name was eventually changed to the Norfolk ranch, and was bought out by the Douglas Lake Cattle Co.


Campbell Carroll in "Three Bar. The Story of Douglas Lake" states that in 1905-1906, Goodwin was charged by J. B. Greaves of the Douglas Lake Ranch with horse stealing. (Carroll had his dates wrong.)Carroll also notes that Jack Budd was an accomplice of Goodwin's, and that charges were laid against him also. Despite the testimony of a young cowboy employed by Goodwin named Oliver Walker, who testified that he and Goodwin had rounded up 28 of the Douglas Lake Company's purebred mares, the charges were dismissed. Walker also testified that 11 of the Douglas Lake horses had their brands treated to an application of a blistering agent such as lump jaw or spavin cure. This caused the hide to raise and the Douglas Lake brand to come off in three or four days. Walker testified Goodwin said that he intended to ship the animals once they were back in good shape.

During the Ducks robbery investigation, C.P.R. SS Detective Gouch interviewed George Hazelhurst. Hazelhurst noted that he was accompanied by Alfred Goodwin when they found the calf shot and butchered 10 miles from where the three bandits were eventually captured.

1904 Henderson's Directory:
Douglas Lake
Goodwin, Alfred R.G., Stockraiser
Goodwin, Benjamin, rancher
(Wooliams notes that Benjamin is Alfred's brother.)

1905 Henderson's Directory:
Douglas Lake
Goodwin, Alfred RG. Stock raiser
Goodwin, Benjamin. Rancher

In Nina Wooliams' "Cattle Ranch", she notes that Alfred Goodwin had a brother named Fred and that together they had pre-empted land north of Fish Lake near Batchelor's Meadow. It was in August of 1907 that the feud between Greaves and Goodwin reached it's climax with Goodwin being investigated by B.C. Provincial Police Constable Walter Clark of Nicola. On 7 Feb 1908, B.C. Provincial Police Chief Constable Fernie arrived at Sawmill Lake with an arrest warrant and a search warrant. Goodwin's lawyer Mcintyre managed to get Goodwin's trial moved to the Spring Assizes in Vernon, where the jury was unable to come to an agreement. Mr. Justice Irving held the case over until the fall assizes in Kamloops in October and Goodwin was released on bail. In October the Kamloops jury returned a verdict of "Not Guilty." (???)

Goodwin's defense lawyer at the 1908 Fall Assizes in Kamloops was Alec Mcintyre, and the judge was Paulinus Irving. Both had held the same positions at Bill Miner's trial 2 years previously.
Indications formed from the following documentation infer that Goodwin had been kept in custody, at least part of the time, since his arrest.

21 Feb 1908, Friday
Nicola Herald
Bail Was Refused
Goodwin Convicted For Trial On Seven Charges
Oliver Walker Gives Damaging Evidence Against the Accused.
Come Up For Trial At Spring Assizes.
The preliminary hearing of the charges against A.R. Goodwin was held at Monday and Tuesday before E.T.W. Pearse, J.P. Charles Wilson, KC, appeared for the prosecution, A.D. Mcintyre, assisted by J. Murphy, representing Goodwin. After J. Whiteford had sworn to the information the court was cleared of witnesses in the case. J.B. Greaves, manager for the Douglas Lake Cattle Company was called and then swore to the company's brand stating that cattle raised by his company were branded on the right hip, bought cattle being branded on the left hip. Oliver Walker deposed that about April 12th he rounded up 28 head of horses belonging to the Douglas Lake Cattle Company in the Company's Marsh Meadow. They were taken into the corral at Greaves and the brands of 14 head were treated to an application of certain lump-jaw and spavin cure, which acting as a blister agent raised the hide where applied and caused the brand to slough off in 3 or 4 days. In this operation he was assisted by prisoner Goodwin and the animals with others to a total of 25 removed to a field belonging to the accused who in conversation with witness expressed his intention to ship them after they got well. Later accused had got into a row with a man named Lauder over some beef and Lauder had said that he had seen enough that day to put the accused in jail. Accused, who was not informed of what Lauder had seen asked witness what he had better do about it and witness replied that he did not know.
Cross-examined
Witness was born in Colorado and was occasionally occupied in riding. He was about 18 years of age when he left there. He was 24 now. He came to Canada with an uncle to take up land and was not in trouble of any sort when he left Colorado nor was he wanted there. He had not re-visited the place and the Colorado people knew his address. Witness came to Kamloops by way of Calgary and Medicine Hat in November of 1904. After staying a couple of months, witness went to work for the Douglas Lake Cattle Company and stayed there 18 months and being dismissed for neglect of duty went to work at Goodwin's.
William Lauder, Joseph Cootlie (sic), J. McCoy and the three Lamprose also gave evidence.
Goodwin was committed for trial on seven charges they being horse stealing, disfiguring brands on horses, disfiguring brands on cows, stealing cow and calf, killing steers, theft of calves, theft of steers, bail refused.

Same issue, page 4
Local Notes
J.B. Greaves, manager of the Douglas Lake Cattle Co., George Bent and Walter Clark, Provincial Constable returned from Kamloops today where they had been attending the Goodwin preliminary hearing.

GR1323
Microfilm Reel B2061
Files 3686/08 to 5046/08.
B.C. Attorney General Correspondence Files, Inward and Outward, 1902 to 1937
Files from 1908
Calendar for the assizes to be held at Vernon 19 May 1908
Included on the list for the assizes are a number of people, including a number of charges to an Alfred R. Goodwin (He stole cattle and horses and defaced brands from the Douglas Lake Ranch.)
Charges 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 are all against Goodwin.
Theft of 25 colts. Jury disagreed.
Defacing brands. Stood over until next assizes.
Theft of a yearling steer. Stood over until next assizes.
Theft - No bill.
Theft - No bill
Theft - No bill
Judge - Paulinus E. Irving.

GR1323
Microfilm Reel B2061
Files 3686/08 to 5046/08.
B.C. Attorney General Correspondence Files, Inward and Outward, 1902 to 1937
Letter to Deputy Attorney General McLean
15 Oct 1908
Sir,
Re Kamloops Fall assizes 1908.
The assizes commenced Monday 5 October and the Crown's business was concluded Monday evening about 5 o'clock, the 12th instance. The cases against Rex vs Gabriel Narcisse vs Johnny Hall vs Cecille and Soupion and Goodwin (2 indictments) stand over until the next assize. In the first three cases witnesses were not present. In the Johnny Hall case a true bill was found, but in Gabriel Narcisse and Cecille and Sanpion the witnesses were not present and the judge did not like the Grand Jury finding.
(Skipped)
Rex vs Goodwin for stealing 25 colts the prisoner was acquitted and as already mentioned the other two indictments against him stand until the next assizes. I formally move for judgment.
Charles Wilson

GR1323
Microfilm Reel B2061
Files 3686/08 to 5046/08.
B.C. Attorney General Correspondence Files, Inward and Outward, 1902 to 1937
Letter from ETW Pearse, Clerk of the Peace, Kamloops
16 Oct 1908
To D.A.G. McLean
Sir,
I have the honour to forward to you forthwith all the papers connected with the cases which were not disposed at the assizes just closed.
(Number of cases listed)
Then
Rex vs Goodwin
2 cases, original depositions and copies.
2 indictments marked “True Bill”.
(Goes on further, then …)
The accused was placed a personal bond for $5,000 in open court.
I have the honour to be Etc.
ETW Pearse, Clerk of the Court.

(That was Mr Goodwin's sentence! This letter was posted to the Deputy Attorney General after the assizes had taken place in October in Kamloops.)

Nicola Herald
Friday 16 Oct 1908
P1
Goodwin Acquitted On Charge Of Horse Stealing
In the autumn assizes at Kamloops before Justice Martin, the case against Goodwin, Fish Lake rancher, charged with stealing horses and obliterating brands of a number of animals belonging to the Douglas Lake Cattle Company. After a prolonged trial the jury brought in a verdict of Not Guilty. There are three more charges against Goodwin which will be held at the next assize.

GR1323
Microfilm Reel B2061
Files 3686/08 to 5046/08.
B.C. Attorney General Correspondence Files, Inward and Outward, 1902 to 1937
Kamloops, B.C.
24 Oct 1908
To Honourable AG
Sir,
I have the honour to enclose the calendar of the court of assizes held at Kamloops on the 5th instance.
Signed
Tunstall, Registrar

(On that calendar is Alfred Goodwin, indictment for stealing 25 colts, finding of the Grand Jury - True Bill, plea - Not Guilty, Verdict - Not Guilty.)
GR1323
Microfilm Reel B2061
Files 3686/08 to 5046/08.
B.C. Attorney General Correspondence Files, Inward and Outward, 1902 to 1937
Letter from (Charles?) Wilson
To Deputy Attorney General McLean
26 Oct 1908
Dear Sir,
Rex vs Goodwin, Kamloops Assizes.
I enclose herewith a letter received from Mr. Mcintyre. It seems to me under the circumstances that it is one of those expenses properly incurred by the Crown but did not like to sanction it without authority.
(Skipped.)
Signed
Charles Wilson

The following is on Mcintyre and Murphy letterhead, Barristers and Solicitors, Kamloops
17 Oct 1908
To Charles Wilson Esq., KC, Vancouver
Dear Sir,
Re Rex vs Goodwin, you will recall that under the judge's instructions Goodwin during the process of his trial was to be treated as a first class misdemeanant. The Sheriff made inquiries of me as to a constable attending him. I was very busy at the time and informed him that I would become good in the meantime. He has accordingly, sent in a bill amounting to $16.00. Surely this is one of the services that the Crown might very well pay for.
I intended to have called to your attention the matter before you left town but it slipped my mind.
Yours Very Truly,
Alex D. Mcintyre.


Frank GORDON166,304 was living in May 1906 in Grande Prairie, B.C. He was part of the Ducks robbery investigation. He died in 1949 in Grande Prairie, B.C. He was interviewed by B.C. Provincial Police Constable Gardom after the robbery at Ducks. Frank Gordon, with his wife Ellie, came to Grande Prairie early in the settlement of the area. At the time he was interviewed by Constable Gardom in 1906 he was probably managing the Adelphi Ranch in Grande Prairie for Colonel G. Cecil Whitaker, who was absent much of the time. Gordon was quite a polo fan, and it was through this sport that he would meet B.C. Provincial Police Constable Fernie and his family. The Fernie Family were great polo players also, and Daphne Fernie, the youngest daughter, told the writer that they would often stop and stay with the Gordons in the 1920s when they made their way back and forth from Vernon. Daphne was attending private school there.
The writer's maternal grandfather, John Portman, operated the Pylewell Hotel in Westwold in the 1930s and 1940s, until it burned down in 1943.
In May of 1906, after the robbery at Ducks, Constable Gardom was making his way west from Vernon to Grande Prairie, and between the second bridge and Grande Prairie, he met a Mr. "Gordon". Gordon told Gardom that a short young man on a gray was in Grande Prairie, and Gordon thought that he had slept in the hotel that night. As Gardom and Gordon were talking, the short young man on the gray horse came riding up towards them.


Mayor Marshall Pollock GORDON18,43,305 In 1906 he was a Magistrate and Justice of the Peace in Kamloops, B.C.1,277 Gordon was a merchant in Kamloops. He had a furniture store on Victoria Street. He lived on Lorne Street in 1906. He died on 22 Apr 1929 in Victoria, B.C. Marshall Gordon, as Justice of the Peace, presided over the preliminary hearing of the robbers in Kamloops in May of 1906.

1898 B.C. Voter's List
Gordon, Marshall Pollock, Kamloops, Victoria St, S. side, Furniture dealer, YN

In the 1901 Census Gordon appears with his wife Emma and his three sons; Marshall, Stanley and Vivian. Gordon is noted as a "cabinetmaker". They had two lodgers staying with them; Alfred and Isabelle Morris.

Gordon served on the 1st Kamloops Municipal Council in July of 1893 as an alderman. He was a furniture store owner, and opened his store in Kamloops in 1884 with his brother J.D. Gordon. J.D. returned to Ontario in 1889, but Marshall stayed on the become Mayor and Justice of the Peace. He was Mayor in 1897, 1898, 1901, 1902, 1906 and 1907. He retired from his store in 1904, and another brother, J Lynn Gordon, an undertaker, took it over.

Spouse: Emma Isabella BORTHWICK. Mayor Marshall Pollock GORDON and Emma Isabella BORTHWICK were married on 22 Sep 1885 in Victoria, B.C.


In May 1906 Detective C GOUCH78,303 was a C.P.R. Special Service detective during investigations in Kamloops, B.C. He was with the C.P.R. Special Service in Nelson, B.C. He conducted interviews in the Kamloops area after the robbery. Along with Bullick, Detective Gouch confirmed Miner's identity at his trial in Kamloops.

The spelling of his last name is confirmed in a report he wrote to Detective McLaws, 23 May 06.

In an interview with the Vancouver Province (4 June 1908) B.C. Provincial Police Sup't Hussey gives Gouch credit for assisting him in the investigation of the Ducks robbery.
VProv, 4 June 1906

Hussey in an interview with the Province said C. Gooch (sic) was with the C.P.R. Special Service police and was from Nelson.

In his report to McLaws of 23 May 1906, he signs himself as C. Gouch. At that time he had just finished interviewing Bostock's men on the ranch out at Ducks. That morning Constable Fernie had been out at Ducks issuing subpoenas.


Thomas W. (Tommy) GRAHAM.166 Thomas Graham is a shady character who only surfaced well into the writer's research. At first he only appeared in less than glowing terms in B.C. Provincial Police Constable Gardom's report, but then he was again found when going through the Kamloops newspapers for Oct 1903 to May 1906.

Kamloops Standard, 4 February 1905.
Thomas Graham, with Homfray and Craig of Grande Prairie, were charged with stealing a considerable sum of money, but the case was dismissed. Graham subsequently pleaded guilty to common assault. (This will be followed up on further when time permits.)

B.C. Provincial Police Constable Gardom's report on the investigation of the Ducks robbery.
In Grande Prairie, accompanied by Frank Gordon, Gardom interviewed 'Talbot', a clerk at Homfray's hotel, as well as "Butler J. P." The two Grande Prairie residents intimated to Gardom that they were suspicious of an individual named "Mohr". He had left Grande Prairie that day (May 9th) saying he was heading to Summit Lake (Monte Lake) but had gone in the opposite direction towards Vernon. (Gardom note insert: Another trail to Paul Stevens in connection with Campbell Creek. Graham lives here.) Talbot then told Gardom that they were suspicious of (Paul) Stevens and Tommy Graham. The last they had seen of Stevens he was heading towards Ducks the day previously (May 8th).

They (Capt Graves and ?) saw Stevens and T. W. Graham ("bad character" is inked in over the typewritten portion of the report at this location) returning from Ducks with their wagons on the next day (Wed 9th?). They had met just at Westrupe's place in the afternoon of that day.


GRANDE PRAIRIE.31,140,306 Grande Prairie first appears on a map in 1832, and was given it's name by two Frenchman who originally settled in the area. It was on the original route of the Brigade Trail during the 1820s.

1904 Henderson's Directory:
Grande Prairie
(Also see Glen Emma)
A country Post Office on the Okanagan Road in the Yale District, 18 miles from Ducks, where is the nearest railway station, mails semi-weekly. Has a public school, Methodist and Episcopal Mission services. A large tract of country each side of the valley remains unexplored. There is a government trail to Douglas Lake and Nicola from Grande Prairie.
Post Master. Lucy Clemitson
Pop. Abt 150

In "H's" and "GH's" reports of 18 May 1906, they interviewed a number of residents of the Grande Prairie area. They were investigating the habits of the robbers prior to the robbery on the 8 May 1906. Mr. Thomas Graham had seen Miner near the Commonage during the first week of June in 1905. This may have been during the time Miner had been working for the Douglas Lake Ranch.
W.M. Homfray recognized the photo of Miner, but could not be specific as to time nor place.
George Butler of Grande Prairie repeated his former observations of the robbers camped west of Duck's Ranch.
Mrs. Tom Smith had also seen Miner ride by her place in the summer of 1905.
F. J. Clemitson, who lives about one mile below H. Guernsey's Store in Grande Prairie said that he had seen Miner and one other ride by at 7:00 AM, heading north, about 3 weeks ago. He could not remember the colour of the horses.
H. Guernsey of Guernsey's Store remembered Miner riding by his place in the summer of 1905.
Mr Woods also recognized Miner, but could not remember details as to time or place.

When C.P.R. Special Service Detective William McLeod was doing interviews at Ducks Station 18 May 1906, he was advised that "a man named King who lives at Grande Prairie could give more information regarding Miner, Edwards."

Email from Sandi Pringle, 16 Jan 2006.
Further to our discussions yesterday, Ingram was building the "Halfway Trading Post' when he passed away, the Kirkpatricks ran it in the 1880's when they rented the Ingram property.
You are right on the Glenemma post office, Grand Prairie served to the present day Falkland ranch and Adelphi to the west, Summit Lake (Monte Lake) and almost to Fish Lake (Salmon Lake)

Pylewell was built in 1914.
Grand Prairie Assembly Hall-across from church-had up to 8 dances a year
Grand Prairie School-next to hall on west side
Adelphi Hotel-also had post office and a store.
Thomas Knight ran the store and also had the first vehicle at that time.
George Wright had a blacksmith shop near Guernseys Store. (near current bridge)
Grand Prairie Polo Team won the Roper Cup 1901-1906.

From Quelle Grande Prairie,
St. Luke's was built in 1898. (Anglican.)


GRANITE CREEK.31 1904 Henderson's Directory:
Granite Creek
(see also Princeton)
(p165)
A mining camp situated at the forks of Granite Creek and Tulameen River. (N Fork of Similkameen River.) 60 miles from Coutlee, Yale District, Railway station, telegraph and express office , Spence’s Bridge, distance 110 miles.
Hope distance 77 miles, but all goods come to Spence’s Bridge, which is also the telegraph office used.
Industries, placer mining for gold and platinum, and cattle raising.
Post Master. FP Cook

An advertisement in the Kamloops Inland Sentinel of 27 Nov 1903 notes that Clark and Stewart were the owners of the Nicola and Princeton Express and Stage Lines. This stage line left Kamloops for Nicola lake Mondays at 6:00 a.m. The same line left Spence’s Bridge every Thursday at 6:00 a.m. for Nicola, Aspen Grove, Otter Lake, Granite Creek and Princeton. The owners also noted that special rigs could be furnished to their customers at any time "for all points in the Similkameen by wire to Spence’s Bridge."


Captain A. E. GRAVES119,138,307 was with Montgomery heading to Grande Prairie by wagon and met Edwards & Dunn before the robbery. He was part of the posse pursuing the robbers. He was living in 1906 in Kamloops, B.C.1 He provided a statement to C.P.R. Detective McLeod. A.E. Graves' initials are obtained from his letters to Hussey asking for employment with the B.C. Provincial Police after the end of the Ducks robbery incident.

Noted as a guide also, he showed up at the Steven's ranch to meet Pearse with the single bloodhound and B.C. Provincial Police Const. Young.

After the Ducks robbery trial, he wrote a number of letters to Sup't Hussey attempting to join the B.C. Provincial Police, but there is no indication he was successful. He wrote on Kamloops Club stationary, and indicated that he had served in the Boer War.

His witness statement to C.P.R. Detective McLeod stated that, in company with Mr Montgomery, and on their way to Grande Prairie, they ran into Edwards and Dunn about 2 miles west of Campbell Creek. He identified the robbers from the photos McLeod showed him.

Sometime after the robbery, an unknown writer (Freeman Harding? Signature illegible.) (In the 1905 Directory, Freeman Harding was the editor of the Kamloops Standard. This was probably the individual who wrote on behalf of Graves.) wrote Hussey recommending Graves to the B.C. Provincial Police. Graves was noted as "an old army man" and had a lot of experience that would serve the B.C. Provincial Police force well. The writer also noted that Graves would not be averse to serving anywhere in the province.


Alice GREAVES.213 Parents: Manager Joseph Blackburn GREAVES and Mary Ann WILSON (CAVANAUGH).


In 1906 Joseph Benjamin GREAVES137,308,309 was a rancher in Campbell Meadows area, east of Kamloops, B.C.  He was the son of Joseph Blackbourne Greaves, the Douglas Lake Ranch owner.

Pearse's June 1906 report to Hussey states that "Jos. B. Greaves gave information as to the stray horses, which I sent him after and which afterwards figured importantly in the case, he also assisted me on the range on the 10th and 11th and rejoined me later on the 13th as guide to Const. Young (with bloodhounds) and returned to Kamloops."
All indications point to the fact that this is Joseph Blackburn Greaves' son. The father was one of the original owners of the Douglas Lake ranch.

Pearse in Kamloops sent a telegram to Hussey in Victoria at 4:20 pm, 12 June 1906. In it he included Greaves Jr. as instrumental in ensuring the successful capture of the Ducks robbers. The list included all those who Pearse felt should benefit from the reward monies.

In Deputy Attorney General McLean's closing argument notes, he states that Graves (sp) found two horses hobbled on the 9th of May, the day after the robbery. Both horses were branded with an "M". He handed over the horses to the posse, and subsequently identified the horses in the (prison?) yard in Kamloops.

Member of Fernie and Pearse's posse. Found the two hobbled horses. This was not the George Graves who met the robbers on the way to Grande Prairie and who tried to join the B.C. Provincial Police. Joe Greaves Jr. appears in the famous photo of the posse.

In a letter to the Kamloops Museum and Archives, Lottie Miner Morton relieved her ill cousin Selma Sexton, teaching at the South Campbell Creek school, and stayed with the William McLeods. Lottie Morton remembers that Joe Graves (Joe Greaves Jr.), who was a school trustee at the time, would put a 22 shell in the stove pipe of the school as a "Hello and Good Will" to Lottie each time he happened to ride by. She arrived in Campbell Creek in Oct of 1911. She mentions that even though her maiden name was Miner, she was no relation to the train robber. She was originally from Grand Pre, Nova Scotia. Her cousin, Selma Sexton, may have been Toddy Pratt's school teacher. Parents: Manager Joseph Blackburn GREAVES and Mary Ann WILSON (CAVANAUGH).

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